Web Standards Is A Journey Not A Destination


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Warning: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone. in /web1/user32319/website/__header.php on line 195

2nd August 2005 · Last updated: 9th December 2011
 

This caught my eye today, from an interview with Daniel Frommelt by The Web Standards Project (WaSP):

"Web Standards is a journey not a destination. We are all continually learning, so get up to speed and share the wealth because there is a lot more to learn! We have yet to scratch the surface on the DOM and Aural CSS, much less all of the really cool things going on now with the new recommendations at W3C!"

Daniel was responsible for organising a remake of Slashdot's front page two years ago. You may remember an article on A List Apart about this. Daniel managed to show that Slashdot's old-school code of tables and font tags could be replaced with XHTML and CSS, saving many bytes. It was then straightforward to produce a mobile version, a print stylesheet and rearrange the layout easily. You can read more in an article on Daniel's University of Wisconsin-Platteville site.